Berkeley EB Norcal 1956

[East Bay and Northern California, unedited footage] by Golden Gate Films Inc.Publication date1956 circa Credits Not attributed, but certainly the work of Golden Gate Films, Inc. “slop” images, stray frames between sequences, are from other GGF films. source:https://archive.org/details/East_Bay_and_Northern_California_unedited_footage Prelinger Archives…

Berkeley EB Norcal 1956

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[East Bay and Northern California, unedited footage]
by Golden Gate Films Inc.Publication date1956 circa
Credits
Not attributed, but certainly the work of Golden Gate Films, Inc. “slop” images, stray frames between sequences, are from other GGF films.

source:https://archive.org/details/East_Bay_and_Northern_California_unedited_footage

Prelinger Archives

Uploaded by
A/V Geeks
on April 2, 2012
0:00 Fascinating Rhythm – Vince Guaraldi Trio (writers: George and Ira Gershwin)
Vince Guaraldi – piano Eddie Duran – guitar Dean Reilly – bass
From the “Vince Guaraldi Trio” debut studio released in the US by Fantasy Records in September 1956. It was recorded in San Francisco, California, in April 1956. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vince_Guaraldi

2:49 Mountain Greenery – Bing Crosby (writers: Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) from the album Bing Sings Whilst Bregman Swings (1956) recorded on June 12, 1956 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bing_Crosby

6:25 Waiting on a Train – Jerry Lee Lewis (writer: Jimmie Rodgers aka The Singing Brakeman who recorded his original version for Victor Talking Machines in October 1928 for release Feb 1929) this version from Jerry Lee Lewis is period correct based on his auditions for Sun Records ocurring November 1956

8:07 Lonesome Train on a Lonesome Track – Johnny Burnette Trio (writers: Glen Moore, Milton Subotsky)
Recorded July 5 1956 in Nashville. The trio (Dorsey Burnette – bass fiddle, Johnny Burnette –vocals and guitar, Paul Burlison – electric guitar) was augmented withTony Austin on drums. This is the unreleased alternate take, remastered per the 1989 Bear Records full compilation. The documentation shows they started off their session with two takes of this tune ahead of work with additional session musicians, whom they were reportedly shocked to find in attendance at the behest of the producer. The first, less energetic take was used for “Rock Rock Rock” (filmed in Fall of 1956 and released December), as well as released on their single (Coral ‎– 9-61758 released Jan 7 1957 per Wikipedia but listed as 1956 in Discogs). It has become collectable and is worth $300, despite the consensus the alternate take was better and featured their more outrageous performance. It was possible that considerations of how they could lip sync and perfom it on the screen lead to using the more staid version.

10:15 Smokestack Lightnin – written (? note 1) and performed by Chester Burnett aka Howlin Wolf with guitarist Hubert Sumlin, bassist Willie Dixon, and drummer Earl Phillips, features also pianist Hosea Lee Kennard and guitarist Willie Johnson, Harmonica by Howlin’ Wolf; recorded January 1956 with benefit of post production sound engineering (dubs? certainly variable reverb) creating a sensational hit reaching number 11 in Billboard R and B charts that year. It was re-released in the UK in 1964 with chart success again. It’s early release date caused the song to initially be pressed as a 78rpm 10″ shellac record but it was soon also available as 7″ vinyl single being listed with the release year 1956, either version is worth about $200.

Note 1. In 1984, Chess released the 1954 recording by Muddy Waters of another version of the song which was done with his own guitarist Jimmy Rogers and his own pianist Otis Spann. This meant they might have created the template with their own song arrangement rather than perform their cover of any other unknown version that existed long before Howlin’ recorded it two years later in 1956. Most reviewers could not conceive the arrangement was Muddy’s (and Dixon’s) original, unaware of the evidence of the timeline.
http://euroblues.org/a-memphis-wolf-in-sheeps-clothing-muddy-waterss-smokestack-lightning-songwriting-and-the-postwar-blues-business/ proposes the rivalry between Muddy and Howlin’ made it unlikely Muddy would choose a song written by Howlin’. His hits had been relying upon Willie Dixon’s writing. Willie Dixon had the role of Producer, likely arranger, and maybe was writer but that was undisclosed when the earlier Muddy version was not released. When Howlin’ recorded it, it might have been useful to incentive Howlin’ with the credit. Once Howlin’ nailed it, it seemed impossible to imagine he had not uniquely created the sound and deserved the songwriting credit. The real credit is due to Willie Dixon’s role and the post production engineering that created such a breakthrough sound.

13:18 Dream Train – Rosalie Allen and Chet Atkins

15:30 I’ll be Home – The Flamingos

18:26 My Blue Heaven – Hoosier Hotshots

20:51 That’s What I learned in College – Hoosier Hotshots

23:06 See You Later Alligator – Bobby Charles

25:55 Come and Go to That Land – The Soul Stirrers (with Sam Cooke) – beginning only short edit

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