Chess Tactics in the London System Chess Opening 😲 80/20 Tactics Multiplier – IM Eric Rosen

Looking for an ultra-flexible chess opening for White? Look no further than the London System, an opening that can be played against almost everything Black plays. Get instant access with 35% off. ► https://ichs.co/2m1YoHy The London System is a flexible…

Chess Tactics in the London System Chess Opening 😲 80/20 Tactics Multiplier - IM Eric Rosen

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Looking for an ultra-flexible chess opening for White? Look no further than the London System, an opening that can be played against almost everything Black plays. Get instant access with 35% off. ► https://ichs.co/2m1YoHy

The London System is a flexible chess opening which White can use against virtually any of Black’s setups. This makes it the perfect choice for players who prefer to understand key strategic and tactical ideas instead of having to memorize an endless number of theoretical variations.

Each opening has its own unique tactical patterns. Patterns you need to know to succeed. IM Eric Rosen’s course on the essential tactics in the London System gives you a complete understanding of the typical patterns for both sides. Even if you only play against the London System, knowledge of these resources will prove invaluable.

The London System is a chess opening for White which occurs after the moves 1.d4 & 2.Bf4 or 2.Nf3 and 3.Bf4. The London System was put into the public eye in a tournament in London in 1922.

Unlike the Colle System, White develops his dark-squared bishop outside the pawn chain. White’s next few moves depend on the setup that Black chooses. Usually, White plays 1.d4, 2.Bf4 and either 3.e3 or 3.Nf3. White ends up with a strong pawn on d4, well protected by e3, without blocking in the dark-squared bishop. This gives him harmonious development and no real targets for Black.

For many years, a very classical way to play the London System was to play slow thematic moves like Nf3, e3, c3, h3, Bd3 or Be2 and 0-0. However, the move order with 2.Bf4 allows more options such as 3.Nc3 against Black’s King’s Indian setup, going for immediate center expansion with e2-e4. For this reason, according to theory, the move 2.Bf4 is considered to be more accurate than 2.Nf3 as it leaves White with more options against Black’s various setups.

One of the most attractive attributes of the London System is that you can play it against nearly any of Black’s setups – massively reducing the amount of time spent studying openings.

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