English Attack – Stockfish vs Leela Zero | Chess.com Computer Chess Finale

Title: English Attack – Stockfish vs Leela Zero | Chess.com Computer Chess Finale Opening: English Opening, Anglo Grunfeld Hello Chess Friends and Welcome to the Channel. Yesterday it was rest day at the World Team Chess Championship, but I had…

English Attack - Stockfish vs Leela Zero | Chess.com Computer Chess Finale

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Title: English Attack – Stockfish vs Leela Zero | Chess.com Computer Chess Finale
Opening: English Opening, Anglo Grunfeld

Hello Chess Friends and Welcome to the Channel. Yesterday it was rest day at the World Team Chess Championship, but I had some spare time and I decided to find a nice game to show you. For the first time on my channel I will show you a match between chess engines. PleaseTell me in the comments if you also like some computer chess. The two engines in today’s video are probably the two strongest chess engines in the world. Stockfish, the champion, against Leela Zero in the Chess.com Chess Computer Winter Classic finale. A series of game between the two engines with 10 minute plus ten seconds time control. The first engine to reach a score of plus-six in a minimum of 40 games will be declared champion. The game that I’m going to show you is game number 27 where Stockfish plays a beautiful english opening. Let’s review the game together.

[Event “CCC 6: The Winter Classic Final (10|10)”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “2019.03.10”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Stockfish”]
[Black “Lc0”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “A34”]
[Annotator “Gabriele”]
[PlyCount “91”]
[EventDate “2019.??.??”]
[TimeControl “600+10”]

1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 {the Anglo-Grunfeld} 3. cxd5 Nxd5 {The first 3 moves were
chosen before the game, from now on the two engines will decide by themselves
what to play} 4. Nf3 {this is the second most played move, not the mainline.
Leela Zero continues with c5 controlling d4 and both engines agree that this
is the best move} c5 5. d4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 g6 7. e3 Bg7 8. Bb5+ {is the move that
both engines had in mind but they differ about the answer} Bd7 {is the best
answer for Leela while Stockfish thinks that Nd7 was better} 9. Be2 {it seems
to me that Leela was right} Qa5 {only one game in my database and not between
two grandmasters.} 10. Bd2 O-O {the game is completely original now} 11. O-O
Rd8 {an alternative is} (11… Qa4 {that sort of equalize the game immediately.
Difficult not to exchange queens but possible. If} 12. Qb1 Bc6 13. Bd1 Qa6 14.
a4 Rd8 {with an equal game}) 12. a4 {probably to avoid Qa4 and so Leela
retreats the Queen to} Qc7 13. e4 Nc6 14. d5 Ne5 {Stocjfish liked Na5 more but
interesting is their general evaluation: Stockfish thinks to have more or less
the inittial advantage while Leela thinks that White was able to make some
progress.} 15. Ne1 c4 16. Be3 {controls the dark diagonal to be able to play f4
} ({if} 16. f4 {now} Nd3 17. Nxd3 cxd3 18. Bxd3 Bxc3 {and Black equalized the
game}) 16… e6 17. f4 Nd3 18. e5 exd5 19. Bxd3 cxd3 20. Bd4 b5 21. axb5 Bxb5
22. Nxd3 Qc4 23. Rf3 Bd7 24. Re3 a5 25. g4 a4 26. Qf3 {the queen will support
the kingside attack. Stockfish is confident that the rook and the knight can
stop Black’s initiative on the queenside} a3 27. f5 {Like Stockfish, I start
to believe that white’s advantage is becoming strong. Leela zero plays} Re8 {
but what happens if Black plays} ({what happens after} 27… Rdb8 28. f6 a2 29.
fxg7 Rb1+ 30. Re1 Bxg4 31. Qf1 Rxe1 32. Nxe1 Qb3 33. Nd3 Bf5 {and it seems
that even down a piece, Black can cause some problems} 34. Nb4) 28. Nc5 (28. f6
Bf8 29. e6 {is not possible anymore} Bxe6) 28… Bc6 29. Qf2 {both engines
agree that White is better} a2 30. e6 Bxd4 31. cxd4 Re7 (31… Qxd4 {is a
tactical mistake. The queen indirectly attacked by white ‘s queen. A simple
discovery and it’s game over} 32. exf7+ Kxf7 33. fxg6+ Kxg6 34. Re6+ Rxe6 35.
Qxd4) 32. f6 Rea7 33. Qb2 {increase the scope of the queen} fxe6 34. Rb3 Ra5
35. Rb8+ {Leela moves the King to f7 because Capturing on b8 leads to checkmate
} Kf7 (35… Rxb8 36. Qxb8+ Kf7 {White only has one weakness: the d4 square
but Stockfish has a great move in mind} 37. Nxe6 {protecting d4 and
threatening mate on f8} Kxe6 38. Re1+ Kxf6 39. Qf4+ Kg7 40. Re7+ Kg8 41. Qf7+
Kh8 42. Qf8#) 36. Nxe6 {capturing the knight leads to checkmate starting with
Re1 with check} Bb5 {disconnects the rook and the queen but there is no time
to defend the position} 37. Ng5+ Kxf6 {only move} 38. Rb7 R8a7 (38… Kxg5 {
is a forced checkmate in 7} 39. Qd2+ Kxg4 40. Qg2+ Kf4 41. Rf7+ Ke3 42. Qf2+
Ke4 43. Rf4+ {closing the net} Kd3 44. Rf3+ Ke4 45. Qe3#) 39. Re1 {it’s
already a forced checkmate} Qc7 {is a depserate try} 40. Rxc7 Rxc7 41. Qf2+
Kxg5 42. Re5+ Kh6 43. Qf8+ Rg7 44. Qf4+ g5 45. Re6+ Rg6 46. Qf8# 1-0

A beautiful checkmate and a beautiful attack by Stockfish. What do you think? Did you like the game? Let me know in the comments. Our analysis is over, thanks for watching and see you tomorrow probably with a new beautiful game from the World Team Chess Championship 2019.

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